Call Us Today! 0116 2799083 | Next Day Delivery on Orders Before 4pm|Sales@InStyleLED.co.uk
Multizone LEDs – Power, Control & Wiring2019-07-30T13:46:13+00:00

LED Power, Control & Wiring – comparing all the options for Multiple Lighting-Zone LED Projects

Multiple lighting area LED projects (also called multiple zones or multizones) are those where your LEDs are divided into different groups of lights that can be controlled independently or synchronised together. Each group/area must be powered and controlled, and you can do this in several ways.

We explain more below. Select the type of LED project you wish to power, control & wire:

1:   Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (non-dimmable)

2:   Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (mains-dimmable)

3:   Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (RF dimmable)

4:   Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone RGBW (colour adjustable) LED Strip Projects using RF

5:   Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White or RGBW LED Strip Projects dimmed using DALI / DMX / 0-10V (ideal for integration withLutron/ KNX etc home automation)

LED Power, Control & Wiring – short answers:

1: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (non-dimmable)
(3 minute read)

Option 1:

The most cost effective option is to wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply and one switch. All lights will then be powered on/off together.

Option 2:

You could have several power supplies, each wired to one LED strip or multiple LED strips, but still have the 240v input cables for all the power supplies wired back to one single switch. All lights will then be powered on/off together.

Option 3:

Kitchen breakfast bar under cut-out-ceiling feature LEDs

One power supply (or several power supplies) could be wired to multiple LED strips, and each 240v input cable could wired back to multiple switches. This would mean that all lights will be powered on/off together, but this switching can be done from a choice of switches is different locations.

– for example, 2 identical switches in a kitchen, at opposite ends of the room.

Option 4:

Several power supplies could each be wired to one or multiple LED strips, and multiple switches could then wired to each individual power supply. This would give you on/off switch control of each area independently.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting’s power supply wired to one switch, the kitchen island lighting’s power supply on another switch, and the undercabinet lighting’s power supply on another switch. This configuration allows all three areas to be turned on/off individually.

Undercabinet kitchen lighting from 5W white LED strips

2: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (mains-dimmable)
(3 minute read)

chrome-finish TRIAC rotary dimmer

A rotary mains-dimmable wall controller (TRIAC)

Option 1:

The most cost effective option is to wire multiple LED strips back to one dimmable power supply and one rotary dimmer switch. This lets you dim all lights and switch them on/off together.

Option 2:

You could have several dimmable power supplies, each with one or multiple strips wired to them – but still have all the 240v input cables wired back to just one rotary dimmer switch. All lights will then be powered on/off and dimmed together.

Option 3:

Several dimmable power supplies, each with one or multiple strips wired to them, could each be wired to one of several rotary dimmer switches (i.e., one power <=> one switch). This would give you on/off/dimming control of separate areas.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting’s power supply wired to one rotary dimmer, the kitchen island lighting’s power supply on another rotary dimmer, and the undercabinet lighting’s power supply on a third rotary dimmer. This configuration allows all three areas to be turned on/off and dimmed individually.

Bookcase with mains-dimmable LED feature-lights

Option 4:

There are more alternative approaches to dim white LED strip lights, in one lighting zone or multiple zones. Please see below for further details – click here.

3: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (RF dimmable)
(3 minute read)

Option 1:

The most cost effective option is to wire multiple LED strips back to a single power supply, a single receiver and one dimming switch. All lights will then be powered on/off via the switch, and also be controlled together via a single-zone LED controller (all light will be dimmed together).

Option 2:

You could have several power supplies and receivers, each with one or multiple strips wired to them, but with all the power supplies’ 240v input cables wired back to one switch.

Using this configuration, all lights will be powered on/off together via the mains switch – but because you’ve got multiple LED receivers, you also have the option to control LEDs using a single-zone dimmer (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone dimmer (receivers can be controlled individually, or all synchronised).

Four-zone wall dimmer for white & single-colour LEDs

Multizone wall control for white LEDs

Option 3:

You could have one power supply (with a receiver) or have several power supplies (with receivers), each with one or multiple strips wired to them, and with all the 240v input cables wired back to multiple switches. All lights will then be powered on/off together, and provide the option to turn on/off and dim in different locations.

– for example, two switches in a kitchen. both at opposite ends of the room.

Because you have several receivers, you will also be able to use a single-zone controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone controller (all receivers can be individually controlled, or all synchronised).

Upper-landing art enhanced by warm white LEDs

Cool white LEDs with RF dimming

Option 4:

You could have several power supplies and receivers, each wired to one or multiple LED strips, and have several switches wired only to individual power supplies. This arrangement offers on/off switch-control of separate areas.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting’s power supply wired to one switch, the kitchen island lighting’s power supply on another switch, and the undercabinet lighting’s power supply on another switch. This configuration allows all three areas to be turned on/off individually.

Because you have several receivers, you will also be able to use a single-zone controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone controller (all receivers can be individually controlled, or all synchronised).

4: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone RGBW (colour adjustable) LED Strip Projects using RF
(3 minute read)

Option 1:

The most cost effective option is to wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply, one receiver and one one switch. All lights will then be powered on/off via the switch and be controlled together via a 1 zone controller (all lights synchronised together only).

Option 2:

RF LED colour control in a bedroom installation

With several power supplies and receivers, each with one or multiple strips wired to them, you can still have all the 240v input cables wired back to one single switch.

This will let you power all lights on/off together via the mains switch, and because you have several receivers you’ll also have the additional option to use a single-zone LED controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone LED controller (each receiver can be individually controlled, or all synchronised).

Option 3:

You could install one power supply (with one receiver) or have several power supplies (all with their own separate receivers), each with one or multiple strips wired to them, and with all the 240v input cables wired back to multiple switches. All lights will then be powered on/off together, but with the additional option to power on/off in different locations.

– for example, two switches in a kitchen. both at opposite ends of the room.

Because this setup includes several receivers, it will also give you the option to have a single-zone LED controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone LED controller (each receiver can be individually controlled, or all synchronised).

Option 4:

You could have several power supplies and receivers, each with one or multiple strips wired to them, and with several switches that are each wired to individual power supplies. This would give you on/off switch control of separate areas.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting’s power supply wired to one switch, the kitchen island lighting’s power supply on another switch, and the undercabinet lighting’s power supply on another switch. This configuration allows all three areas to be turned on/off individually.

Because you have several receivers, you will also be able to use a single-zone controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone controller (all receivers can be individually controlled, or all synchronised).

Media panel with 10W RGBW LEDs

10W RGBW plinth/cabinet lighting

5: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White or RGBW LED Strip Projects dimmed using DALI / DMX / 0-10V
(ideal for integration withLutron/ KNX etc home automation)
(3 minute read)

Nicolaudie LED control panel

Option 1:

When using any of these LED control protocols, you will always need a power supply, a compatible LED receiver, and LED strips. All receivers must be able to be connected together via a signal cable, with a further cable wired to the controller (the type of cable to be used varies for each control protocol).

You could have multiple power supplies in multiple areas, each with one or multiple receivers attached. The LED strips wired to each receiver can then be individually dimmed/controlled via the main controller.

Golden light from RGBW LEDs in this skylight

LED Power, Control & Wiring – longer answers:
(with example diagrams, videos & tips)

Warm white InStyle LEDs and HDL smart-home automation

1: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (non-dimmable)
(20 minute read)

Option 1:

Wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply and one switch. All lights will then be powered on/off together.

Advantages:

This is the most cost-effective option for multizone wiring, because you are only using one power supply and no form of LED-dimming control. Therefore, you will only be paying for one power supply, which can be a larger model (in terms of both power/wattage and physical size) because it will be powering all of the LED strips in your installation.

Disadvantages:

Wiring can be tricky – particularly if you’ve not considered the distances between your components and the distances between them. Depending on how far through your the project you are when start thinking about connections, you may find it difficult to get all wires from the LED strips back to one power supply.

Wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply and one switch - wiring diagram

fig 1: one power supply, one switch (non-dimmable)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips and power supply at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Warm white 5-watt LED tape lights up this bedroom

Option 2:

Multiple power supplies, each with one or multiple strips wired to them, can still have all the mains-power (240-volt) input cables wired back to a single switch. All lights will then be powered on/off together.

Advantages:

A low-cost option (but not as cheap as option 1) – because you are not using any form of LED dimming, the cost remains relatively inexpensive. If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips. If for any reason there was a fault or other maintenance issue, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Multiple power supply / powers supplies wired back to a single switch - wiring diagram

fig 2: multiple power supplies, one switch (non-dimmable)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Warm-white light creates a wall-wash effect from these 10-watt LED tapes

Option 3:

You could one power supply or have several power supplies – each with one or many strips wired to them, and with all the mains-power (240-volt) input cables wired back to multiple switches. All lights can then be powered on/off together, but with the additional option to turn LED in different locations on/off independently

– for example, two switches in a kitchen. both at opposite ends of the room.

Advantages:

A relatively low-cost option, as you are not using any form of LED dimming.

You would have two switches in place to turn the LED strips on/off, ideal for larger rooms.

Disadvantages:

The only disadvantage of this option is that you’ll need to be able to take 2 x 240v cables from wherever you mount the power supply over to where you are going to fit the two wall switches.

One or more power supplies, each with an independent switch - wiring diagram

fig 3: one or more power supplies, multiple switches (non-dimmable)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Remodelled barn using 12-volt (10W) LED tape

Option 4:

You could have several power supplies, each with one or many LED strips wired to them – and have several switches, each to one individual power supply. This would give you on/off switch control of each area independently.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting on one switch, the kitchen island lighting on another switch, and your undercabinet lighting on a third switch. This allows all three areas to be individually turned on/off.

Advantages:

A relatively inexpensive wiring option; as this configuration doesn’t use any form of LED dimming, the installation remains very cost-effective.

You can set up separate control of each lighting area, splitting your LEDs into groups as you require.

Disadvantages:

You will need to have multiple wall switches.

Multiple power supplies, each switched independently- wiring diagram

fig 4: multiple power supplies, each switched independently (non-dimmable)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

5-watt pure white LED strip used to frame a bathroom mirror

2: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (mains-dimmable)
(20 minute read)

Option 1:

Wire multiple LED strips back to one dimmable power supply and one rotary switch. All lights will then be powered on/off / dimmed together.

Advantages:

Enables full dimming very cost-effectively, as you will only be paying for one power supply. This can be a larger type in terms of power/wattage (and size), in order to have enough power to drive all of the project’s LED strips.

Disadvantages:

Wiring can be tricky – particularly if you’ve not considered the distances between your components and the distances between them. Depending on how far through your the project you are when start thinking about connections, you may find it difficult to get all wires from the LED strips back to one power supply.

Wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply and one dimmer - wiring diagram

fig 5: one power supply, one switch (mains-dimmable)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips and power supply at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.
TRIAC wall dimmer for LEDs - wiring example

Wiring a mains-dimming wall control

Mains-dimming rotary controller from Aurora

Option 2:

Install multiple dimmable power supplies – each with one or multiple LED strips wired to them, but still with all the mains-power (240-volt) input cables wired back to just one rotary dimmer switch. All LEDs will then be powered on/off together and dimmed together.

Advantages:

If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips. Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple LED strips back to multiple power supplies and one dimmer - wiring diagram

fig 6: multiple power supplies, one dimmer (mains-dimmable)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Option 3:

You could have several dimmable power supplies, each with one or many LED strips wired to them – and have several dimmer-switches, each wired to just one of the power supplies. This would give you on/off/dimmable control for multiple lighting areas (‘zones’) independently of each other.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting wired to one dimmer switch, the kitchen island lighting on a second dimmer switch, and all the undercabinet lighting on a third dimmer switch. In this way, all 3 areas can be turned on/off and dimmed individually.

Advantages:

Full dimming of each area, giving you the ability to set different light levels.

Disadvantages:

You will need to have multiple wall dimmer switches.

Wire multiple LED strips back to multiple power supplies and multiple dimmers - wiring diagram

fig 7: multiple power supplies, multiple dimmers (mains-dimmable)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

2 Channel Wireless Dimmer Video

3: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White LED Strip Projects (RF dimmable)
(20 minute read)

Option 1:

The most cost-effective option for a multizone RF-dimmable installation is to wire multiple LED strips back to just one power supply, one receiver and one dimmer switch. All lights will then be powered on/off together via the switch, with additional dimming control via a single-zone RF controller (all lights will be dimmed together only).

Advantages:

This is the most cost-effective option for multizone wiring, because you are only using one power supply. Therefore, you will only be paying for one power supply, which can be a larger model (in terms of both power/wattage and physical size) because it will be powering all of the LED strips in your installation.

Disadvantages:

Wiring can be tricky – particularly if you’ve not considered the distances between your components and the distances between them. Depending on how far through your the project you are when start thinking about connections, you may find it difficult to get all wires from the LED strips back to one power supply.

Wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply / receiver and one switch - wiring diagram

fig 8: one power supply, one receiver, one switch (RF dimmable)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips and power supply at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

single-zone remote LED dimmer

Multizone wall-mounted LED dimmer

Single-zone keyfob LED dimmer

Option 2:

For more control, wire your LED strips to several power supplies and receivers (i.e., each power supply has one or multiple strips wired to it), and connect all the power supplies’ 240v input cables back to a single switch. With this setup, all the LEDs will be powered on/off together via the single mains switch. Further dimming control is available by using the multiple LED receivers – by pairing all of them to a single-zone RF dimmer-control, you’ll be able to dim all the LEDs together; or use a multizone dimmer-control instead, and you’ll be able to control each group of LEDs independently.

Advantages:

A full-dimming installation.
If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips.
Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple LED strips back to multiple power supplies / receivers and one switch - wiring diagram

fig 9: multiple power supplies & receivers, one switch (RF dimmable)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Marlow International reception area (staircase)

Option 3:

You could one power supply (with one receiver) or have several power supplies (with several receivers) – each with one or many strips wired to them, and with all the mains-power (240-volt) input cables wired back to multiple switches. All lights can then be powered on/off together, but with the additional option to turn LED in different locations on/off independently.

– for example, two switches in a kitchen. both at opposite ends of the room.

Because you have several receivers, you can also enable a single-zone controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone controller (all receivers can be individually controlled, or all synchronised) for additional control.

Advantages:

Full dimming of each area, giving you the ability to set different light levels.
If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips.
Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

You will need to have multiple wall dimmer switches in each area.
This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple power supplies & receivers, controlled by one (or more) switches - wiring diagram

fig 10: multiple power supplies & receivers, controlled by one (or more) switches (RF dimmable)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips, power supplies and receivers at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supplies in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

24-watt white LED tape unspooled from its reel

Option 4:

You could have several power supplies and LED receivers, each with one or many LED strips wired to them – and have several switches, each wired back to one individual power supply. This would give you on/off switch control of each area independently.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting on one switch, the kitchen island lighting on another switch, and your undercabinet lighting on a third switch. This allows all three areas to be individually turned on/off.

Because you have several receivers, you can also enable a single-zone controller (all lights synchronised together) or a multizone controller (all receivers can be individually controlled, or all synchronised) for additional control.

Advantages:

Full dimming of each area, giving you the ability to set different light levels.
If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips.
Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

Areas can only only be switched on/off independently, rather than through a single switch.
This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply / receiver / switch - wiring diagram

fig 11: multiple power supplies / receivers, one switch each (RF dimmable)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips, power supplies and receivers at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supplies in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Multichannel Receiver Video

4: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone RGBW (colour adjustable) LED Strip Projects using RF
(20 minute read)

Option 1:

The most cost-effective option for a multizone RF-dimmable installation is to wire multiple LED strips back to just one power supply, one receiver and one switch. All lights will then be powered on/off together via the switch, and colour/brightness an be controlled via a single-zone RF controller. (All LEDs will be controlled together; no independent control for different zones.)

Advantages:

This is the most cost-effective option for multizone wiring, because you are only using one power supply. Therefore, you will only be paying for one power supply, which can be a larger model (in terms of both power/wattage and physical size) because it will be powering all of the LED strips in your installation.

Disadvantages:

Wiring can be tricky – particularly if you’ve not considered the distances between your components and the distances between them. Depending on how far through your the project you are when start thinking about connections, you may find it difficult to get all wires from the LED strips back to one power supply.

Wire multiple LED strips back to one power supply / receiver and one switch - wiring diagram

fig 12: one power supply, one receiver, one switch (RF RGB/RGBW)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips and power supply at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

20-watt RGBW LED strips in kitchen

Option 2:

For more control, wire your RGB(W) LED strips to several power supplies and receivers (i.e., each power supply has one or multiple strips wired to it), and connect all the power supplies’ 240v input cables back to a single switch. With this setup, all the LEDs can be powered on/off together via the single mains switch. For colour/brightness control, use the multiple LED receivers – by pairing all of them to a single-zone RF RGB(W) LED controller, you’ll be able to control all the LEDs together; or use a multizone dimmer-control instead, and you’ll be able to control each group of LEDs independently.

Advantages:

Offers the option of multizone control.
If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips.
Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple LED strips back to multiple power supplies / receivers and one switch - wiring diagram

fig 13: multiple power supplies / receivers, one switch (RF RGB/RGBW)

Tips:

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supply in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Kitchen project using 20-watt RGBW LED strip lights

Option 3:

You could install a single power supply (with one LED receiver) or have several power supplies (each with its own receiver) – each wired to one or many LED strips, and with all the mains-power (240-volt) input cables wired back to multiple switches. All lights can then be powered on/off together, but with the additional option to switch LEDs in different locations on/off independently.

– for example, two switches in a kitchen. both at opposite ends of the room.

For colour/brightness control, use the multiple LED receivers – by pairing all of them to a single-zone RF RGB(W) LED controller, you’ll be able to control all the LEDs together; or use a multizone dimmer-control instead, and you’ll be able to control each group of LEDs independently.

Advantages:

Full multizone colour & brightness control.
If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips.
Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

You will need to have multiple wall dimmer switches in each area.
This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. If you’re planning to use multiple power supplies, this means you will need to be able to hide each one from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple LED strips back to multiple power supplies / receivers, with multiple switches - wiring diagram

fig 14: multiple power supplies / receivers to multiple switches (RF RGB/RGBW)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips, power supplies and receivers at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supplies as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supplies in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

LED garden cabin for an outdoor hot-tub. Lit by 20-watt RGBW LEDs

Option 4:

You could have several power supplies and LED receivers, each with one or many RGB(W) LED strips wired to them – and have several switches, each wired back to one individual power supply. This would give you on/off switch control of each area independently.

– for example, in a kitchen you may have the plinth lighting on one switch, the kitchen island lighting on another switch, and your undercabinet lighting on a third switch. This allows all three areas to be individually turned on/off.

For colour/brightness control, use the multiple LED receivers – by pairing all of them to a single-zone RF RGB(W) LED controller, you’ll be able to control all the LEDs together; or use a multizone dimmer-control instead, and you’ll be able to control each group of LEDs independently.

Advantages:

Full colour/brightness control for each area independently, giving you the ability to set different light levels.
If you already have existing 240v mains wiring in place, you’ll be able to install the power supplies near to your LED strips.
Should there be a fault or other maintenance issue, for any reason, it is likely to only affect the strips wired to one particular power supply, and not all of the LED strips across the installation.

Disadvantages:

Areas can only only be switched on/off independently, rather than through a single switch.
No central on/off switch for power.
This option is typically used when there are already 240v cables in each area, close to where the LED strips are going to be. This means you will probably need to be able to hide each power supply from view (so they don’t affect the light output of the LEDs by being the in the way, blocking the light and casting shadows).

Wire multiple LED strips back to multiple power supplies / receivers & multiple independent switches - wiring diagram

fig 15: multiple power supplies / receivers, multiple independent switches (RF RGB/RGBW)

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use this option, get the wiring in place at the start of your build – so that the cables are already in place, ready to connect the strips, power supplies and receivers at a later time/date.

– for example, before plastering a ceiling.

  • You can have the power supply as far away from the LED strips as you require, just as long as you use the correct thickness of cable to avoid any voltage drop (otherwise voltage drop may cause a loss of brightness along the length of the LED strip).
  • Install the power supplies in an accessible location, in case maintenance in required.

Kitchen plinth lights with 10W RGBW LEDs

5: Power, Control & Wiring for Multizone White or RGBW LED Strip Projects dimmed using DALI / DMX / 0-10V (ideal for integration withLutron/ KNX etc home automation)
(7 minute read)

Option 1:

These LED control protocols are more complex than simple RF dimming cand colour/brightness control. If you choose to use any of them, there are a number of requirements common to all:

  • you will always need a power supply
  • you will need a compatible LED receiver
  • and you’ll need LED strips (of course)

When designing your installation plan, remember that all of your receivers must be positioned to allow them to be connected together via a signal cable, with another cable wired back to the controller (the type of data-cable required depends on which control protocol you’ve chosen to use).

Full home automation (this panel is an HDL system)

You can install multiple power supplies across multiple lighting areas/zones, each with one or more protocol-compatible LED receivers attached. By doing this, the LED strips wired to each receiver can then be individually dimmed/controlled via the main controller.

Advantages:

Lighting control systems such as DMX and DALI offer superior granularity and the option of creating unique lighting programs and sequences that are designed for your specific taste and location.
Home-automation protocols, like Lutron, KNX and DMX, all allow lighting control to be integrated into a broader smart home control system. This may include features like alarms, blinds/curtains, garage doors, air-conditioning and much more.

Disadvantages:

Designing and installing a home-automation system can be very technically complex.

Tips:

  • If you are planning to use one of these control protocols, you should work with a design and installation expert who is fully certified in your chosen system.

Smart lighting control with a home automation system

COVID-19 update from InStyle LED - Ordering for NHS or other Key-Worker projects? Let us know so we can make you our top priority! - We are trading as usual for all other orders and, as always, next-day delivery is available. Keep safe, and best wishes from the InStyle team!